Waterfalls are actually the result of geological activities. However, in order to explain these natural and geological phenomena, the M’nong and Ede people living on this land have passed interesting legends on to their children.

Bang Rup rapid
Bang Rup rapid

One of the stories often told is the legend of Trinh Nu Rapids (Bang Rup). Once upon a time, this rapids was ruled by Bang Rup God. He was so aggressive, bossy, and annoying that frightened all villagers when they overpassed his place. He also had no friends to interact though he had tried many ways to attract everyone’s attention. Despite his presence with annoying actions, the villagers together with other gods still lived in harmonied and peacefully. Especially in haversting season, they celebrated and danced in gongs rythmn all day and night, which annoyed Bang Rup God.

Not being invited to any celebrations, he got very angry and found many reasons to open fights with the Gods of Leng Sang (Dray Sap waterfall), Leng Nur (Dak Nur waterfall), Leng Gung N’tao (Seven-storey waterfall), causing a lot of damages and casualties. So angry with Leng Mrok’s groundless aggression that these Gods decided to  joined forces and powers to fight against Bang Rup God. Through many fierce battles, the army of Bang Rup was defeated and he suffered from pain and fear, so he did not dare to harass the Gods and villagers anymore.

From the geological perspective, the story is a very reasonable explanation when the basalt column is broken and lay in many layers without any certain orders. The stone blocks form many beautiful rapids that delight tourists when visiting. But hiddenness of the story is to advise the descendants to live modestly and non-aggressively in order to keep the village’s unity and harmony.